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In subterranean Seattle, thousands of miles of tunnels, pipes and cables keep the city running

Dave Muto, water systems operations manager with Seattle Public Utilities (in back), walks along a 54-inch water line that runs underneath Interstate 405 in Renton and delivers water to Seattle. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

You’ve in all probability heard of the Underground Tour — however perhaps not the actual workings of the town beneath our ft.

A CITY IS LIKE a mushroom, or an iceberg: Everybody is aware of the flashy half above the bottom, or water. However this protuberance wouldn’t exist and not using a huge unseen substructure under: the nine-tenths of the iceberg that lies underwater; the buried webs of fungal mycelia that ship up the spore-bearing appendages we name “mushrooms”; the equally intricate net of tunnels, pipes, bunkers, cables and conduits that transport water, sewage, electrical energy, steam, mild pulses, trains, cars, individuals and even rats underneath the town. With out these substructures, our bungalows and workplace towers can be as helpless as plucked mushrooms.

THE BACKSTORY: Pioneer Sq.’s underground ‘consolation station’ impressed a author to go deeper

Seattle is extra conscious than many cities of its decrease depths, thanks to 2 mid-20th-century newsmen: the late Seattle Occasions columnist John J. Reddin, who tagged alongside on hearth inspections beneath what have been then referred to as Skid Street and Chinatown, and touted the buried “ghost city” there, and Invoice Speidel of the rival Seattle Star, who noticed the business prospects. However the Underground Tour Speidel based and the competing Beneath the Streets tour cowl only a slice of the world that retains the town working.

Get to realize it, and also you may by no means see the bottom beneath your ft in the identical approach.

WE WON’T GO DOWN as boldly as metropolis sanitary engineer E. French Chase and two colleagues did almost 90 years in the past. They donned rain slickers and fuel masks, dropped a collapsible rowboat down a manhole close to the baseball stadium on Rainier Avenue and paddled 18 miles via the sewers earlier than rising close to the Ship Canal. Later inspectors would rope up, mount skateboards and snap pictures as colleagues on the different finish of the road towed them by means of dry sewers.

As we speak, Seattle’s sewer managers conduct their inspections safely by way of closed-circuit tv. They and their colleagues within the waterworks get to their pipelines by way of locked portals scattered virtually invisibly all through the city panorama. One results in a tunnel chopping beneath Interstate 405 in Renton, at whose middle runs a raised 54-inch pipe that appears bigger, its leak-stopping wrap shimmering like an enormous serpent gathering to strike.

That is Cedar River Pipeline Three, which carries one-fifth of the water utilized by 1.four million individuals in Seattle and neighboring cities. Downstream, it runs beneath Beacon and Capitol hills and ends on the Maple Leaf Reservoir in northeast Seattle. Upstream from the reservoir, on the uphill aspect of I-405, this utility hall rises straight up for 55 ft underground, forming a vertiginous concrete bunker that may be accessed by an open-grate stairway.

“Appears like a missile silo,” says Dave Muto, Seattle Public Utilities’ water methods operations supervisor.

Muto says this part of Pipeline Three — constructed within the early 1990s, with enlargement joints between sections and shut-off valves on each side of I-405 — is among the seismically sounder hyperlinks in Seattle’s water system. Not so an older a part of the road that runs beneath downtown Renton, nor sections of the three different Cedar River pipelines and three different main strains within the system. A current seismic research discovered that these doubtless would fail, leaving Seattle and far of the encompassing space with out water for as much as two months if we had a serious earthquake just like the 2011 Tohoku and Christchurch quakes — and that there’s an almost 1 in 5 probability of that taking place within the subsequent 50 years.

Muto no less than is aware of what to anticipate. He was working in Los Angeles’ water division in 1994, when the Northridge quake busted water mains in 2,000 locations. He didn’t get loads of sleep within the weeks afterward.

Dave Muto, water systems operations manager with Seattle Public Utilities (in back), walks along a 54-inch water line that runs underneath Interstate 405 in Renton and delivers water to Seattle. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

Dave Muto, water techniques operations supervisor with Seattle Public Utilities (in again), walks alongside a 54-inch water line that runs beneath Interstate 405 in Renton and delivers water to Seattle. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Occasions)

FOR MOST OF the previous 125 years, Seattle’s engineers and officers remained blissfully oblivious to risks like seismic fault zones. They began digging in 1894, tunneling with shovels and wheelbarrows beneath Denny and Beacon hills in an effort to divert a number of the sewage that was turning lakes into cesspools. Extra sewers adopted, along with practice, water, stormwater and freeway tunnels; pedestrian tunnels for hospital sufferers and downtown buyers; and a singular bus/rail tunnel.

Then as now, digging by means of the native glacial stew of sand, gravel, boulders and clay was no cakewalk.

“The factor about tunneling round right here is you all the time know what circumstances you could have — proper right here!” says Sound Transit development supervisor Brad Cowles, who has overseen the completion of Seattle’s longest subterranean passageway, a light-rail tunnel from Jackson Road to Northgate Mall. “Three ft away, it may be utterly totally different.”

Cowles and different trendy diggers at the very least take pleasure in boring machines that slide concrete sleeves in place and shoot grout behind them to carry the bottom agency. Those that excavated downtown’s Nice Northern railroad tunnel 115 years in the past needed to throw up picket covers, afterward coated with concrete, to include the leaky soils above. As these soils settled, floor ranges dropped as a lot as Three ft, damaging the brand new Carnegie Library (and drawing lawsuits as late as 1972). A would-be second practice tunnel collapsed at Yesler Approach three years later, in 1907.

Fiel Diaz, cable-splicer crew chief with Seattle City Light, talks about feeders that run from Western Avenue to First Avenue near the Seattle waterfront. He is in an electrical tunnel at the Seattle City Light substation on Western Avenue. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)Fiel Diaz, cable-splicer crew chief with Seattle City Light, talks about feeders that run from Western Avenue to First Avenue near the Seattle waterfront. He is in an electrical tunnel at the Seattle City Light substation on Western Avenue. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

Fiel Diaz, cable-splicer crew chief with Seattle Metropolis Mild, talks about feeders that run from Western Avenue to First Avenue close to the Seattle waterfront. He’s in an electrical tunnel on the Seattle Metropolis Mild substation on Western Avenue. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Occasions)

With shovels and wheelbarrows, the Nice Northern staff proceeded at a remarkably quick 18 ft every day till they hit cement-like blue clay and needed to bore. However not all of the interruptions they encountered have been, nicely, boring. At 140 ft under Fourth Avenue and Spring Road, they discovered the stays of a prehistoric forest, together with a solid-looking Three-foot tree trunk that crumbled after assembly the air. Greater than a century later, crews changing Seattle’s seawall additionally uncovered an intact log, and different detritus, from rails and ties to shoe scraps — a metropolis’s story writ in refuse. Jack Johnson, an archaeologist on the College of Washington’s Burke Museum, is piecing collectively the historical past of native brewing, distilling and consuming from excavated bottles.

Mark Kirschenbaum, assistant director of Campus Utilities at the University of Washington, talks about a section of the 7-plus miles of tunnels on the UW campus. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)Mark Kirschenbaum, assistant director of Campus Utilities at the University of Washington, talks about a section of the 7-plus miles of tunnels on the UW campus. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

Mark Kirschenbaum, assistant director of Campus Utilities on the College of Washington, talks a few part of the 7-plus miles of tunnels on the UW campus. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Occasions)

TODAY, SEATTLE’S SOILS include rather more than artifacts. Hundreds of miles of tunnels, pipes and cables wind, twine, criss and cross by means of the bottom — the arteries, capillaries, nerves, ducts and guts of the physique civic. Seattle Public Utilities delivers water by means of 1,823 miles of pipeline and takes it again by way of 1,422 miles of sewers. One other 485 miles of storm drains captures rainwater that might flood the streets and makes sewers overflow.

Seattle Metropolis Mild retains the juice flowing by means of 899 miles of buried main strains. And, unbeknown to many, 18 miles of underground piping carries steam at concerning the velocity of sound from Enwave Seattle’s (previously Seattle Steam’s) gas-fired plant on Western Avenue to 192 motels, hospitals, and residential and workplace towers round downtown and First Hill. Circulating at 380 levels, this steam not solely heats the buildings, saving the price of cumbersome on-site boilers, but in addition sterilizes the hospitals’ surgical devices. And, when it leaks, it warms water strains as properly.

“Some buildings will get faucet water 30 levels hotter than regular,” says Muto. “I name Seattle Steam, they usually say, ‘We don’t have an issue.’ I say, ‘Sure, you do … ’ ”

The College of Washington boils its personal steam; 7-plus miles of vaulted tunnels, as deep as 80 ft, carries it all through the campus, along with electrical energy, compressed air and chilled water for air con.

Even such a tidy, self-contained system isn’t resistant to intrusion. Sound Transit engineers laying mild rail beneath the campus just lately nudged one check bore over to spare a sequoia and drilled right into a utility tunnel. Fortunately, they missed the 22-inch pipes carrying steam from the plant and cooled waters returning to it. “In any other case, you’d have hundreds of thousands of gallons capturing out,” says UW Campus Utilities assistant director Mark Kirschenbaum — a ready-made catastrophe film.

From time to time, diggers rating a colossal personal objective. The Washington Division of Transportation’s Huge Bertha — the world’s largest tunnel-borer, dispatched to dig the Freeway 99 tunnel — was famously wrecked by a 115-foot metal pipe buried 11 years earlier — by the Washington Division of Transportation.

David Easton, vice president of business development, points to a chart that shows where steam lines run underneath Seattle. Formerly Seattle Steam, Enwave Seattle provides low carbon heat to approximately 200 buildings in Seattle’s First Hill neighborhood and Central Business District. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)David Easton, vice president of business development, points to a chart that shows where steam lines run underneath Seattle. Formerly Seattle Steam, Enwave Seattle provides low carbon heat to approximately 200 buildings in Seattle’s First Hill neighborhood and Central Business District. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

David Easton, vice chairman of enterprise improvement, factors to a chart that exhibits the place steam strains run beneath Seattle. Previously Seattle Steam, Enwave Seattle offers low carbon warmth to roughly 200 buildings in Seattle’s First Hill neighborhood and Central Enterprise District. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Occasions)

RUNNING STUFF UNDERGROUND does keep away from many issues. Trains don’t tangle with visitors once they’re under the road. Buried wires don’t get gnawed by squirrels or knocked down in storms. Placing lids on reservoirs, as Seattle did post-9/11, protects them from seagull droppings and human mischief, and creates new land for parks.

However going underground additionally creates new issues. Seattle’s moist, acidic soils corrode the naked impartial wires wrapped round cables laid within the floor within the 1970s and ’80s, earlier than Metropolis Mild began enclosing them in conduit or ducts. Growing older sheaths get brittle and crack, and … zzztt. Strains brief, and the lights exit.

Tracing underground shorts can take hours, Metropolis Mild crew chief Fiel Diaz explains: You dig up the center of a shorted line, decide which aspect the brief is on, dig at its midpoint … and so forth and so forth, till you discover the brief — an electrical Zeno’s paradox.

Worse but, a brief can ignite a fireplace in one among Seattle’s 1,564 underground electrical vaults, typically to explosive impact: About eight years in the past, a vault hearth close to Seattle Middle blew a 300-pound hatch cowl 30 ft within the air. The usual response was to let fires burn themselves out, however that meant lengthy delays and compounded injury. Now Metropolis Mild pays to maintain a fireplace truck outfitted with high-pressure carbon dioxide — a fireplace extinguisher on wheels — on name to snuff them out.

Those that keep the sewers and storm drains may want that they had one thing as clear as hearth to deal with. Ray Brown manages the 67 pump stations that hold Seattle’s wastewater going the place it ought to — till nature intervenes.

“That is our Transylvanian crypt,” Brown jokes as we descend right into a quaintly gloomy 1929 bunker hidden amongst Leschi’s view houses. He opens a wall hatch, under which a pungent stream runs down a concrete channel. Only a yr earlier, Brown says, “We had an actual dangerous storm, and the system couldn’t sustain. These motors and pumps” — the place we’re now standing — “have been all submerged in uncooked sewage.”

That’s not the worst of it. “The most important drawback is all of the rags and issues individuals stuff down the [curb] drains,” says pump station technician Scott Helmbrecht. “We get a number of denims and T-shirts. I noticed a park bench come via one time, damaged in half. As soon as, in Ballard, a child seal swam all the best way as much as the examine valve. A man opened it, noticed this face there and took off operating.”

Seals are simply a part of a menagerie of critters that wander up or get flushed down the pipes. “I’ve seen salamanders swim by,” says Helmbrecht. “I noticed a frog in a station by Magnuson Park.” After which there are the rats.

Kris Pape, an inspector with Public Health — Seattle & King County’s solid waste, rodent and zoonotic disease program, lowers test bait to see how many rats are in the sewer below. If enough rats eat the test bait, he will replace it with hot bait, which will kill the rodents. At right is Ketsiri De Bord, a health and environmental investigator with Public Health. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)Kris Pape, an inspector with Public Health — Seattle & King County’s solid waste, rodent and zoonotic disease program, lowers test bait to see how many rats are in the sewer below. If enough rats eat the test bait, he will replace it with hot bait, which will kill the rodents. At right is Ketsiri De Bord, a health and environmental investigator with Public Health. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

Kris Pape, an inspector with Public Well being — Seattle & King County’s strong waste, rodent and zoonotic illness program, lowers check bait to see what number of rats are within the sewer under. If sufficient rats eat the check bait, he’ll substitute it with scorching bait, which can kill the rodents. At proper is Ketsiri De Bord, a well being and environmental investigator with Public Well being. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Occasions)

SEWERS AND SEATTLE each have reputations as rat havens, and each reside as much as them. Public Well being — Seattle & King County rodent inspectors patrol the sewers, regularly hanging check bait in manholes and returning to plant toxic, anticoagulant-laced “scorching bait” wherever the check bait will get bitten. They will’t sustain: “We’re not setting out sufficient traps,” says Kris Pape, one of many dogged rat patrollers. “In areas which have a historical past [such as southeast Beacon Hill]we get hits at 80 % of the check baits.”

The much more decided rats don’t use solely the sewers to navigate the town. Operating 30 ft deep beneath First Avenue, a steeply inclined tunnel lined with thick, bundled cables brings electrical energy to a lot of downtown.

“It’s type of scary right here at night time,” says Diaz, a person unfazed at being caught atop a ladder bouncing like a pogo stick amid swaying brick partitions in Pike Place Market when the Nisqually Earthquake hit in 2001. “These cables turn out to be rat and cockroach highways.”

Darkness and secrecy, the qualities that draw rats underground, are irresistible to some members of one other species: homo sapiens. Because the daybreak of literature, questing heroes have journeyed to the underworld, from Gilgamesh and Odysseus to Alice descending the rabbit gap. A subgenre of flicks, TV episodes and novels, starting with 1973’s “The Night time Strangler,” spins spooky tales beneath previous Seattle — echoing the unusual encounters recounted by tour guides and others working there.

An old wood pipe that once carried water for Seattle residents is on display on Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)An old wood pipe that once carried water for Seattle residents is on display on Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

An previous wooden pipe that when carried water for Seattle residents is on show on Invoice Speidel’s Underground Tour. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Occasions)

Worldwide, the “city explorers” motion promotes intrusions into tunnels and different forbidden websites. A few times a yr, quest-struck college students sneak into the UW tunnels. “It’s cool at first,” says Kirschenbaum. “However after you’ve gone 800 ft and the view hasn’t modified, it’s not so cool anymore …. We lastly received The Day by day to cease itemizing this as one of many issues each UW scholar ought to do. However we nonetheless get a spike each time one thing will get posted.”

Others have sought refuge quite than thrills underground: Greater than 50 years in the past, a thief fled from the Market into the Nice Northern Tunnel and was by no means seen once more; vagrants tried to roast a salmon purloined from a waterfront cannery there however have been chased out earlier than a practice might crash their get together. As we speak’s homeless individuals typically camp within the metropolis’s water and wastewater tunnels, which weren’t locked till current years: “It simply wasn’t wanted once they have been constructed,” says Brown.

Seattle’s underworld guards many secrets and techniques. “Native historical past goes again no less than 13,000 years right here,” says Johnson, the UW archaeologist. “Principally any landform that’s been secure since that day will include native artifacts.”

Reddin, the newsman who launched Seattle to its buried “ghost city,” warned that excursions would by no means attain “the actually fascinating elements of the underground.” Certainly, Pioneer Sq.’s buried treasure, the elegant restrooms constructed 111 years in the past beneath the pergola, has been sealed and left for an additional period’s archaeologists to find — together with who is aware of what else.